Doctoral Students


Sophie Duranceau

Born and raised in Montreal, Sophie received a B.A. in International Relations and International Law from Université du Québec à Montréal in 2008 and a B.A. (Honours) in Psychology from Concordia University in 2011. She completed her MA in Clinical Psychology at the University of Regina in 2014. Sophie is currently pursuing her PhD in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Nick Carleton. Sophie’s primary research is in the area of social support and family wellbeing following traumatic experiences, with a focus on increasing access to care for military members, veterans, and public safety personnel. As a secondary area of research, Sophie is also interested in the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and psychopathology. Sophie’s doctoral research is supported by a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Sophie is currently completing her pre-doctoral residency in Clinical Psychology at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre in 2017-2018.

Email: sophduranceau@gmail.com


Daniel LeBouthillier

Daniel received his Bachelor of Science with First Class Honours in Psychology from the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton) in 2011 and his Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology from the University of Regina in 2014. His Master's Thesis was a randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of a single bout of exercise on anxiety sensitivity. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Daniel’s research focuses on anxiety and trauma, as well as their relationships with physical health. His recently completed doctoral dissertation was a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of aerobic exercise and resistance training in reducing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, as well as their predisposing and maintaining factors. Daniel’s research is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Award. He is currently completing his predoctoral residency in Clinical Psychology at the Nova Scotia Health Authority in Halifax until August 2018.

Email: lebouthd@uregina.ca


Audur S. Thorisdottir

Audur graduated from the University of Iceland with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology in 2011 and with a Master of Science in Clinical Psychology Research in June 2014. Her Master’s Thesis examined mechanisms of change in psychological treatment. Audur is currently pursuing her Ph.D in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Her doctoral dissertation is a randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive and structured online intervention for bullying victimization and social trauma. Other research interests include vulnerability factors in the development of anxiety disorders and PTSD, treatment development and transdiagnostic constructs across disorders.

Email: audursjofn@gmail.com


Michelle Teale Sapach

Michelle received her Bachelor of Arts with High Honours in Psychology in 2011 and her Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology in 2015 from the University of Regina. Her honours thesis examined cognitive risk factors for social anxiety disorder, and her Master’s thesis explored the influence of trauma-like reactions following negative social experiences (e.g., peer victimization, cyberbullying, accidental embarrassing events) on social anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. She received Certificates of Academic Excellence from the Canadian Psychological Association for both her theses. Michelle is now pursuing her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Nicholas Carleton. Her dissertation is examining the efficacy of a self-help self-compassion training program for individuals with social anxiety disorder. Michelle has received several large scholarships during her graduate training, including Canadian Institutes of Health Research Master and Doctoral awards. Michelle’s research interests include the development and treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders, particularly social anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Email: teale20m@uregina.ca


Julia Mason

Julia is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Her Master’s thesis evaluated the efficacy of sprint interval training and moderate intensity continuous training at reducing anxiety sensitivity, a vulnerability construct implicated in the etiology and maintenance of many mental disorders. Julia is interested in the role that exercise can play in the treatment of anxiety-related disorders. Her current research is exploring psychological strategies to help people with anxiety increase their adherence to exercise programs for reducing anxiety.

Email: masonje25@gmail.com


Stephanie Korol

Stephanie received her B.A. in Psychology (Honours) from Mount Royal University in 2012. She then completed a M.Sc. in Experimental Psychology at the University of Calgary. Her M.Sc. thesis investigated the differences in attention disengagement amongst currently, remitted, and never depressed individuals. Stephanie is now working towards her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Regina, under the supervision of Dr. Nick Carleton, after fast-tracking through the MA program. Stephanie’s research interests include cognitive factors underlying psychopathology, primarily in posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety disorders. Her dissertation research plans to explore cognitive factors of risk and resiliency for mental illness amongst public safety personnel. Stephanie’s research has been supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship.

Email: korol20s@uregina.ca


Master's Students


Isaac Hahn

Isaac graduated from Saint Mary’s University in 2015 with a B.Sc. (honours) in Psychology. His honours thesis examined the relationships between social identity clarity and group bias, as well as academic and personal well-being. Isaac is currently pursuing a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Nick Carleton. His master’s thesis research is focused on relationships between anxiety, intolerance of uncertainty, and chronic pain.

Email: isaac.g.hahn@gmail.com


Kelsey Amerongen

Kelsey graduated with distinction from the Bachelor of Arts Honours Psychology Program at MacEwan University in 2015. She is currently pursuing her M.A. in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Kelsey's research interests include the neuropsychological functioning of individuals with anxiety and related disorders. Her Master's thesis will examine associations between attention and intolerance of uncertainty. Kelsey’s research is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Graduate Scholarship Master's Award.

Email: amerongenk@gmail.com


Rachel Krakauer

Originally from Chicago, Rachel graduated from The University of Texas at Austin in 2014 with her Bachelor of Science in Psychology with Highest Honors. Currently, she is pursuing a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology under the co-supervision of Drs. Gordon Asmundson and Nick Carleton. Rachel is interested in the interplay of behavioral health with anxiety and mood disorders as well as operational stress injuries. Her master’s thesis will investigate whether exercise can mitigate the exposure to stressful situations.

Email: rachellkrakauer@gmail.com


Staff


Kadie Hozempa

Kadie received her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology in 2014 from the University of Regina. Her honours thesis examined whether participants encoded the statistical properties of a set presented over an extended period while attending to task-irrelevant properties of the set. Kadie worked with the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region as a research coordinator before coming to fill the same position for the Anxiety and Illness Behaviour Lab in 2016.

Email: kadie.hozempa@uregina.ca