Doctoral Students


Kelsey Vig

PhD Clinical Psychology Student

kelseydvig@gmail.com

Kelsey completed a Bachelor of Arts Honours degree with distinction at MacEwan University in 2015 and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology at the University of Regina in 2018. Her master's thesis examined associations between attention and intolerance of uncertainty. Her research interests include intolerance of uncertainty and its association with mental health symptoms, the relationship between stress and mental health, and exercise as a mental health intervention. Kelsey is completing her PhD in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Her doctoral dissertation examines exercise as an intervention for individuals with suicidal ideation. Kelsey's research has been supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship. She is currently on residency at the University of Ottawa.


Zeinab Ramadan

PhD Clinical Psychology Student

ramadanz@uregina.ca

Zeinab received her Bachelor of Arts with High Honours in Psychology in 2014 at the University of Regina. Her honours thesis was supervised by Dr. R. Nicholas Carleton and assessed anxiety and depressive symptoms within the five factor model and HEXACO model of personality. She received the Canadian Psychological Association Certificate of Academic Excellence for her honours thesis. Zeinab went on to pursue her Master's at Queen's University and received her Master of Science in 2018, funded by the Joseph- Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Her Master's thesis, supervised by Dr. Cynthia Fekken, examined men's attitudes on street and sexual harassment in relation to their personality. Zeinab is now pursuing her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. R. Nicholas Carleton at the University of Regina. Her dissertation will focus on investigating Islamophobia in Canada: 1) focusing on trends of negative attitudes towards Muslims among the Canadian population; 2) the extent Muslim Canadians have experienced Islamophobia and such effect on their mental health; 3) assess the relationship between Islamophobic attitudes, intergroup contact, intergroup disgust, and intergroup anxiety towards Muslims; and 4) assess the effects of imagined contact tasks on Islamophobic attitudes, intergroup disgust, and intergroup anxiety towards Muslims. Her general research interests include personality, anxiety and trauma, discrimination and harassment, and cross-cultural research.


Rachel Krakauer

PhD Clinical Psychology Student

rachellkrakauer@gmail.com

Originally from Chicago, Rachel graduated from The University of Texas at Austin in 2014 with her Bachelor of Science in Psychology with Highest Honors. Her Master's thesis under the co-supervision of Drs. Gordon Asmundson and Nicholas Carleton was a randomized controlled trial assessing preventive exercise on measures of anxiety-related vulnerability factors following an analogue stressor. Confirming exercise acts as a robust tool to support mental health, Rachel designed her doctoral dissertation to evaluate the association between exercise activity and mental health symptoms among Canadian paramedics. The multi-methods design will help describe quantify the association between paramedics physical health and mental health and provide qualitative data to address systemic and organizational barriers to exercise. Rachel's commitment to increasing access to care for vulnerable individuals extends beyond her clinical research activities. She founded and leads the University of Regina's Psychology Graduate Students' Association Anti-Racism Speaker Series @URPsychGrads


Michelle Paluszek

PhD Clinical Psychology Student

mmarta-11@hotmail.com

Michelle graduated from the University of Manitoba in with her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology. She completed her Masters degree at the University of Regina in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. Her Masters thesis, supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Graduate Scholarship Master's Award, examined transdiagnostic vulnerability factors that contribute to COVID-19-related distress. Michelle is currently a second year Ph.D. student. Michelle's doctoral research is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Award. Her interests include investigating the impact of trauma and adverse childhood experiences as well as the relationship between physical health and mental health.


Robyn Shields

PhD Clinical Psychology Student

rshie424@gmail.com

Robyn graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology from Mount Royal University in 2017. She is now a clinical psychology masters student under the supervision of Dr. Nick Carleton. Her research interests include operational stress injuries in Public Safety Personnel, but she has a particular fondness for studying paramedics, as she was a registered paramedic in Alberta for 10 years prior to pursuing her psychology degree. Her Master’s thesis is a qualitative investigation of avoidance behaviour in Canadian paramedics.



Master's Students


Caeleigh Landry

MA Clinical Psychology Student

caeleigh.landry@uregina.ca

Caeleigh received her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology from the University of Regina in 2019. Her thesis examined the impact of uncertainty tolerance and task appraisal on law enforcement students' stress and performance. Her master's research, under the supervision of Drs. Nicholas Carleton and Heather Hadjistavropoulos, focuses on the efficacy of internet-delivered mindfulness-based protocols for Public Safety Personnel. Caeleigh's primary field of interest is the prevention and treatment of mental disorder symptoms in public safety personnel.


Geoffrey Rachor

MA Clinical Psychology Student

geoffrey.rachor@uregina.ca

Geoffrey received his Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology from MacEwan University in 2017, and his Master of Science in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Alberta in 2020. Geoffrey is currently pursuing his Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology at the University of Regina under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. His primary research interests are in studying the relationships between chronic pain and anxiety-related disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder). His Master's research is focused on exploring COVID-19-related stress among individuals living with chronic pain and is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Graduate Scholarship Master's Award.


Blake Boehme

MA Clinical Psychology Student

bab917@uregina.ca

Blake completed a Bachelor of Arts degree graduating magna cum laude from York University in 2021. He is now a clinical psychology master's student under the supervision of Dr. Gordon Asmundson. His primary research interests are in the relationship between rumination and reassurance seeking in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Blake is involved with current ongoing research on the relationship between COVID-19 related stress and mental health conditions. He is a former paramedic and member of the Canadian Forces.


Juliana Khoury

MA Clinical Psychology Student

juliana.khoury@uregina.ca

Juliana completed a Bachelor of Humanities (Hons) with a Minor in Political Science at Carleton University in 2019, and a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in Psychology with a Special Concentration in Forensic Psychology at St. Francis Xavier University in 2021. Her psychology honours thesis examined factors that affect female undergraduates' ability to accurately assess their risk of experiencing sexual victimization. Her master's thesis, under the supervision of Dr. Nick Carleton, will examine gender differences in mental disorder symptoms among RCMP, and the role of sexual assault and harassment in those differences. She is excited to have the opportunity to work on a project that focuses on her two primary interests mental health among public safety personnel, and sexual violence.


Staff


Dalainey Drakes, M.Sc.

Research Coordinator

anxiety.lab@uregina.ca

Dalainey is an aspiring clinical psychologist who graduated with her BA First Class Honours Psychology degree from St. Francis Xavier University and recently completed her MSc in Experimental Psychology from Memorial University. She brings experience conducting health psychology and clinical epidemiological research working with diverse groups across the lifespan. She strives to promote patient-centred research while contributing to multidisciplinary studies to develop targeted health interventions and improve patient prognosis. Her research focus relates to the impact of comorbid OCD, anxiety and depressive-related disorders on symptom severity and prognosis of chronic health and pain conditions.