Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Laboratory

Research

Participants needed: Research in writing treatments for post-trauma symptoms

We are looking for volunteers who have experienced a traumatic or stressful event to take part in a study examining how writing influences post-traumatic symptoms. As a participant in this study, you would be asked to anonymously write about a past experience and complete computer-based questionnaires.

You will need to come to the University of Regina to participate in this study. It will take approximately 1 ½ hours to complete. In appreciation for your time, you will receive a $15 Tim Horton’s gift card.

For more information and to take part in the eligibility screen (approximately 30 - 45 minutes to complete), please go to: http://tinyurl.com/q8hzhh7

For more information about this study please contact:
Christina D’Ambrosio, Department of Psychology, 306-337-2473 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Exposed to trauma and looking for treatment?

A CIHR-funded project being conducted by the Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Lab at the University of Regina is inviting individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 years who have encountered traumatic events and subsequent distress and impairment to participate in a study examining ways to increase the effectiveness of treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The front-line treatment for PTSD today is cognitive behavioral therapy, a variant of which is prolonged exposure therapy, which involves safely and gradually confronting stimuli which cause stress and fear within the security of a therapy session. As effective as this type of therapy is, we are curious of ways to make things better for clients. A recent development has shown that aerobic exercise can reduce PTSD symptoms (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24911173 for a brief description). Since we know that both aerobic exercise and prolonged exposure can help persons affected by PTSD, we want to see if combining the two is as effective, or more effective, than either one alone.

The current research involves persons receiving in-person treatment at the University of Regina Anxiety and Illness Behaviors Laboratory for 12-weeks. This service would cost between $2000 and $2600 if obtained through community practice and would typically require persons to be on a waitlist for services for up to 6 months; however, this treatment is offered at the Anxiety and Illness Behaviors Laboratory free and is available immediately for those who are eligible. Our services are provided by trained therapists and supervised by Drs. Gordon Asmundson (R.D. Psych.) and R. Nicholas Carleton (R.D. Psych.). Services are confidential and your privacy and safety is taken very seriously. Please note that services offered through this study are not intended for legal or insurance purposes.
PTSD is real, it’s serious, and it’s treatable!

If you or somebody you know is interested in the current study please contact the Anxiety & Illness Behaviour Lab at:

(306) 337-2473
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.aibl.ca

 

FIBROMYALGIA?

A CIHR-funded project being conducted by the Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Lab at the University of Regina is inviting individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 years who have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia to participate in a study examining the effectiveness of a new treatment protocol.

Experiencing pain is believed to require at least some application of conscious attention. Evidence has suggested the existence of a neurologically-driven and automatic bias towards pain perception in patients with some forms of chronic pain, including fibromyalgia. There is also growing evidence that the bias can be modified, resulting in pain relief. A new treatment protocol has been developed in the United States and the United Kingdom and initial tests suggest it may be beneficial for people with Fibromyalgia.

The current research is double-checking whether the treatment protocol actually works and evaluating whether it must be administered in a lab or if it can also be administered at patient’s homes.

Participants in the study will receive a free assessment and then be randomly assigned to either a treatment or placebo condition and then to participate either at the clinic or at home. If the treatment protocol proves helpful, those in the placebo condition will of course be offered the treatment as well. Participants will be asked to complete 10 brief sessions over a six-week period. The first and last sessions require approximately 45 minutes each, whereas the 8 middle sessions require only 15 minutes each and happen twice weekly. Sessions will involve watching a computer screen and responding to words on the screen by pressing a button (e.g., 3 or 8) and completion of questionnaires. Participants will be asked to complete the same assessment session 4 months later and then again 4 months after that to see how long the treatment protocol lasts.

Questions? Interested in participating?

Contact the Anxiety & Illness Behaviour Lab at:

(306) 337-2473

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.aibl.ca

 

Design by: Look Matters Inc.